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PREPARATION / APPROVAL OF DEPARTMENTAL GLOSSARIES

 

Scope:

 

A number of Government Departments, Public Sector Undertakings, Scientific Organizations, Banks and other agencies need terminology for their offices/institutes/organizations. CSTT approves the terminology prepared by such institutions as per the standards fixed by the Commission so that the agencies can publish glossaries for the use of their respective organizations. The organization may go for a joint publication with the Commission. The Commission may prepare glossaries for agencies at their request reserving the copyright and publishing it on its own with a price tag.

 

 Procedure adopted for developing departmental terminology:

 

 

This process is carried out in the following ways:

 

 

Method I

 

 

The organization may submit the already prepared glossary alongwith Hindi / Regional Language equivalents of the technical terms to the Commission.  This may be submitted in soft and hard copy form. The concerned organization has to certify that the terms coined by the Commission available in the published form have been considered and used in the manuscript submitted.  After receiving the manuscript the Commission does the following:

 

(i) 

The Commission corresponds with the organization regarding the printing of the manuscript. The manuscript may be either printed by the Commission or by the organization. If the organization wants to publish it has to mention on the front and inner pages that the work has been approved by the CSTT. The publication should also contain a certificate or forward from the Chairman of the Commission. In these cases the concerned organization has to submit complementary copies to the Commission as decided by the Commission. In case the Commission has to print the manuscript, the copyright will be with the Commission and the concerned organization shall undertake to purchase a number of copies as decided by the mutual agreement from the Commission. In any case an agreement is to be signed by the Commission and the organization regarding the terms and conditions.

 

(ii)

An expert advisory committee (EAC) is constituted with the members of the Commission experts in the field and other scholars.

 

(iii)

The EAC verifies whether the equivalents used are the ones already available with the Commission's publications.

 

(iv)

Disparities in the usage are identified and the terms for which equivalents are not available are also listed.

 

(v)

The equivalents for the new terms coined by the organization are assessed as per the principles laid by the Commission. If the terms are as per the principles, they are accepted. Otherwise new terms are coined following the procedures listed in ĎEvolution and publication of technical terms in Hindi.

 

(vi)

Once the manuscript is scrutinized it is sent back to the organization with a letter of approval.

 

(vii)

The publication part of the glossary is taken up either by the Commission or the concerned organisation as per the agreement made before the commencement of the work.

 

 

 

 

 

Method II

 

 

 

 

(i)

The organization may approach the Commission with a proposal that it wants to have a glossary for its employees.

 

(ii)

In this case when the manuscript is not ready with the Hindi equivalents, the Commission, at the request of the organization takes up the job.

 

(iii)

The concerned organization has to submit a list of technical terms.

 

(iv)

There are three options by which further action may be taken.

 

 

a. In Option I the Commission may bear the entire cost of preparation of the manuscript and printing it, keeping the copyrights. This is subject to condition that the organisation is ready to purchase the certain number of glossaries from the Commission at the rates fixed by the Government Press or the Commission.

 

 

b. In Option II the Commission finances either the preparation part or the printing part and the other part is financed by the concerned organization. In this case the publication will be a joint one with the copy rights retained by the Commission and the Organisation

 

 

c. In Option III the entire cost may be borne by the Organisation and the organisation may publish the glossary. The Commissionís role in the process will be to provide experts on behalf of the Commission to standardize the terminology. Since organisation is publishing the glossary and the Commission is approving it, it has to mention on the front and inner pages that the work has been approved by the CSTT. The publication should also contain a certificate or foreword from the Chairman of the Commission. In these cases the concerned organization has to submit complementary copies to the Commission as decided by the Commission.

 

 

 

 

Rules and Regulations:

 

 

The rules and regulations of the development of departmental glossaries are as follows:

 

(i)

There must be a kind of agreement between the Commission and Department/Organisation that is interested in preparing glossaries for the official use.

 

(ii)

If the manuscript is submitted with the equivalents of Indian Languages, the concerned organisation must certify whether the terms treated as equivalents have been taken from the Commissionís approved terms. If for any reason the organisation has found that the word(s) available from Commissionís glossaries are not suitable for their use, such words must clearly be identified.

 

(iii)

If the Organisation submits the manuscript with Indian equivalents but the equivalents have not been taken from the glossaries available, it will be presumed that the manuscript has been submitted without equivalents and Method II will be applicable for such cases.

 

(iv)

The Expert Advisory Committee constituted for the evolution/ approval of departmental terminology must have a maximum number of 12 experts.

 

(v)

Of the 12 experts, a maximum of 6 experts should be from the organisation. Rest of the experts will be from the Commissionís side.

 

(vi)

If the Commission is not paying for the experts, the number of experts from the organisation may be more than 6. In the same way the experts from the Commissionís side may also be more than 6 if the organisation so desires and finances the meeting. In such a case, the total number of experts may exceed 12.

 

(vii)

The publication must contain the name of the officers of the Commission and the organisation who are associated with the preparation/publication of the work.

 

 

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