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IDENTIFICATION OF PAN-INDIAN TERMS

Scope:

 All educationists, linguists and scholars believe a technical term in all Indian languages must bear maximum uniformity so as to facilitate inter-lingual communication and exchange of scientific information in all areas of education, research and sciences. For this purpose, Indian languages must have a common uniform similar corpus of terms for this purpose. Since the roots of technical terms in different states of the country are usually same, there are many terms, which are similar. By identifying these terms the Commission publishes glossaries of PAN Indian terms. Such glossaries are distributed free of cost to the users.

 

Principles for identifying PAN-Indian Terms:

 

(i) 

The Commission from the very beginning emphasized the desirability of evolving terms which could, after necessary adaptation, suit the genius of individual languages, and to be used on all-India basis. With this end in view, the Commission, while constituting Expert Advisory Committees for finalizing terms in various disciplines, ensured that the Committees for finalizing terms in various disciplines comprised reputed scholars, teachers and linguists from all the regions of the country.

 

(ii)

International terms are acceptable to all. These terms are to be retained as such and their transliteration has to be given. Under this category are names of elements and chemical compounds, units of weights, measures and physical quantities, mathematical signs, symbols and formulae, binomial nomenclature, the terms based on proper names and words like Radio, Petrol, Radar etc., which have gained worldwide usage.

 

(iii)

Terms of Perso-Arabic origin are already current and acceptable to most Indian languages.

 

(iv)

Words which have acquired derogatory sense in any language, are rejected outright.

 

(v)

It is well known that most of modern Indian languages are derived from the Sanskrit-based roots and this characteristic is recognized as the first basis of uniformity in our languages. Words of Sanskrit origin are easily accepted in the languages of many States.

 

(vi)

The third basis for this uniformity is English and Urdu words which are used in almost all Indian languages in the sphere of administration, education (English) and courts (Urdu).

 

 

 

 

The Commission, therefore, also undertakes the responsibility of identifying such technical terms prevalent in Indian languages which could be uniformly identified as Pan-Indian terms.

 

 

 

  Procedure for identifying Pan-Indian Terms:

 

 

 

 

(i)

The Commission identifies the fields/ subjects in which Pan-Indian terms are needed on priority basis.

 

(ii)

In the process of identification the assistance from scholars, scientists and linguists of all Indian languages is utilized.

 

(iii)

The best way of identifying the PAN-Indian terms from the National Terminology. If the National Terminology is not available on the subject, the option could be that the regional equivalents can be procured from the scientists/ linguists/ scholars working with their Text Book Boards or similar other agencies belonging to the concerned states. One more option could be that, the equivalents in different regional languages can be taken from bilingual / trilingual glossaries available.

 

(iv)

An Expert Advisory Committee (EAC) consisting of subject experts, linguists, scholars acquainted with terminology development is constituted. The committee comprises of subject experts nominated by the Commission and also the experts as suggested by the States or its agencies depending on need. This committee makes a preliminary list of the Pan-Indian terms.

 

(v)

The Commission organizes a number of National Seminars (on Pan-Indian terms) at different places where subject-experts and linguists belonging to all regional languages are invited to identify/standardize Pan-Indian terms.

 

(vi)

The manuscript prepared is processed for camera-ready copies and sent for printing.

 

(vii)

Once published, the terms evolved are once again subjected to further discussions in workshops, seminars, orientation programmes, training programmes etc organized for the propagation and expansion to ensure proper usage and to see if any corrections and improvements are needed during the revision and updation process of the said glossary.

 

(viii)

If a particular word is not acceptable to an individual language because it is considered impossible to replace an already widely used regional word, that language is left free to retain its terms, as an exception.

 

 

 

Rules and Regulations:

 

 

Following are the rules and regulations associated with the identification of PAN-Indian terms:

 

1. Expert Advisory Committee

 

(i)

An ‘Expert Advisory Committee’ constituted for the identification of PAN-Indian terms in a particular subject normally has a minimum of 25 and a maximum of 30 members. The committee must have full or maximum representation from all languages of the country.

 

(ii)

The total number of experts associated with the identification PAN-Indian terms may normally be limited to 50.

 

(iii)

The ‘Expert Advisory Committee’ will have subject experts, language experts and/or linguists.

 

(iv)

Subject experts of the Committee should be serving or retired Teachers/ Lecturers/ Readers/ Professors/ Scientists/ Engineers/ Doctors/ Technologists/ Professionals/ Officers etc depending on the field on which work is being taken up. Other individuals who are associated with the field but are not serving may be taken as experts but such persons must at least have a Masters degree in the field. Number of retired persons, if taken, must be limited to 1/2 of the total number of experts. Normally the Commission chooses the members of the ‘Expert Advisory Committee’ from the available Bio-data or the Bio-data received from the interested scholars from various parts of the country. As the Commission wants to create subject-wise expert pool, scholars (Retired/Serving) from different parts of the country are requested through publicity material to send their bio-data to the Commission for inclusion in the expert pool. It may please be noted that the scholar chosen to be a member of the Committee must be ready to make his/her services available till the completion of the project.

 

(v)

The number of language experts and/or linguists is limited to 1/4th of the total composition of the Committee.

 

(vi)

Normally, the ‘Expert Advisory Committee’ should not have more than two members from any state.

 

(vii)

Once an ‘Expert Advisory Committee’ is constituted, alterations, additions and deletions of the members are normally avoided.

 

(viii)

EAC meetings may be held in different parts of the country.

 

(ix)

Every Terminology Evolution Session has a target to achieve in terms of number of terms to be evolved.

 

 

 

 

1. Guidelines for Technical Officers:

 

(i)

Two or three technical officers are allotted with one subject/area for the identification of PAN-Indian terms.

 

(ii)

While dealing with allied or non-allied subjects/languages, the technical officers may take the help of a suitable senior member of the concerned Expert Advisory Committee for the coordination of the work of the particular subject/language.

 

(iii)

Every PAN-Indian term identification session should have a target to achieve a certain number of terms to be evolved and such number may be decided and approved by the Chairman.

 

(iv)

After the completion of every session, the senior most technical officer shall submit a report to the Commission in the prescribed format.

 

(v)

Periodically the terms evolved may be put to scrutiny regarding their acceptability in Terminology Standardization Meetings, prior to publication.

 

(vi)

Proposals for PAN-Indian Terminology Identification sessions may be submitted in the file note for the approval of the Chairman in the prescribed format.

 

(vii)

Alongwith the proposal for PAN-Indian Terminology Identification session, a list of the experts of the EAC with designations and addresses may also be submitted. The list may also include the names and/designations the officials representing the Commission.

 

 

 

 

 

A representative of the Commission, preferably a ministerial staff well-versed with the payment procedures may accompany the technical officer to the venue of the PAN-Indian Terminology Identification Session (if it is held outside the Commission). Any officer of the Commission, including the technical officers, may also take up the task of payment.

 

 

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